The Trees of Boranup Forest

As we drove north from Augusta to Yallingup, along Caves Road – Tourist Drive No 250, we stopped for a while at Boranup Forrest and admired the Karri trees (Eucalyptus diversicolor), a native of the wetter regions of Western Australia’s South West.

Being up close to these incredible trees was an awe-inspiring experience.

As we walked away from the road, deeper into the forest, we could see the forest floor sprinkled with wildflowers still in bloom and the fresh smell of eucalypt was invigorating.

The further we walked, the quieter it became, as though these sentinels swallowed all sound.  It was almost ethereal and I felt as though I should have requested their permission to stand amongst them.

These trees are over 60 metres tall

Some of the trees in Boranup Forest have been measured at over 60 metres tall (196.1 feet)

Karri trees have a tall, very straight trunk that doesn’t separate into branches until high up towards the top of the tree.  In the Boranup Forest their branches intertwine, creating an incredibly high canopy.  I would loved to have seen sunlight filtering through, but alas the day was overcast.

For most of the year, their bark appears pale grey, but the trees shed their bark every year around the start of winter, revealing shades of golden orange and salmon pink for a few months.  Some of these trees still had a hint of those golden colours.

Karris are the third tallest tree in Australia and one of the tallest species in the world.  Given the right conditions, they can reach heights of 90 metres (295.3 feet).

There was something very magical about walking beneath their canopy.  Even though we did so for just a short period of time, I could have stayed longer, spending considerably more time with these beautiful Ents.

. . .

The Boranup Forest is a re-growth forest that is over 100 years old.

10 Comments

  1. Thanks again for giving us a glimpse into this beautiful part of the world. Our California redwoods inspire the same sort of reverence. If heaven is a physical place, I’d like to believe it’s a bit like a deep, lush, and quiet forest.

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  2. As you know I was just in a Redwoods Forest and you chose the perfect words to describe such beautiful trees. Even though these trees and the redwoods are different they are of such grand beauty…
    Your stunning captures of this forest made me feel as though I was walking with you. Thank You!

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