Yallingup

Thoughts on Location No 67

Yallingup, South West, Western Australia

Yallingup is an aboriginal word meaning ‘Place of Love’ and the township became a much-loved tourist destination following the discovery of Ngilgi Cave by European settlers in 1899.  But it wasn’t until the 1950’s that it became a surfing destination.  (To read what Dean had to say about it, pop over to his Surfing page.)

Yallingup Beach is now famous for its legendary surf breaks, although the area has many other attractions too – wineries, breweries, restaurants, and a seemingly endless supply of arts and crafts with more galleries than anywhere else in the Margaret River Region.

Surfing wasn’t the only activity undertaken while we stayed at Yallingup.  We visited Ngilgi Cave (See Beneath Margaret River), and we took a trip out to see the Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse.  It’s such a cute little lighthouse, with its little red door, and it’s only 20 metres tall (65.7 feet) although this is because it stands on a 100 metre high bluff overlooking Geographe Bay to the east.  (328.1 feet)

And we visited Canal Rocks, a unique rock formation where the Indian Ocean surges endlessly along a rocky canal that has been carved into a dead-straight line running north to south, with several smaller canals crossing perpendicular to the main canal.

From the carpark, a boardwalk leads out over the expanse of granite and on to a bridge across one of the perpendicular canals.  I’m sure the view from the bridge would be incredible, scary even, when the tide is hide and there’s big waves about.

But we were there on a calm day at low tide  Not that that was a bad thing, because we did get to cross the bridge to explore the other side and scrambled over the rocks to get a better view of the largest canal (as seen on the Google Map above).

It was incredible watching the water flow in and out.

I also went on a winery tour and left Dean to surf the day away.  Margaret River is one of Australia’s youngest wine districts and my day out with Cellar d’Or Tours was amazing, taking in five boutique wineries, local olive, cheese, and chocolate produce, and a superb lunch at a micro brewery.  Despite what a few of my friends might think, I didn’t arrive back ‘smashed’.  But I was a little tipsy.

. . .

The township of Yallingup lies in a spectacular coastal location and with most of the houses built high on the slope of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Ridge, I could only imaging what their view would be like looking out over the Indian Ocean.  Breathtaking I guess.

We stayed more than a week at the Yallingup Beach Holiday Park.  Although we would’ve liked to have stayed longer, this wasn’t possible as the park was fully booked with the 31st Yallingup Malibu Classic being held across the first weekend in December.

Had we known beforehand, we would have made a prior booking.  Dean certainly wanted to settle in for a couple of weeks at least

The park itself was lovely and boasts being the best located park in Western Australia.  It certainly is a great spot for those who want to surf as the beach is just across the street.

4 Comments

  1. I had (have?) a long lost cousin who bought a beautiful piece of property in Yalingup. But I couldn’t find him when I traveled there. I did see the surf…especially at Margaret River!! Do you have a caravan, or stay in hotels?

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    1. Hey Bad Fish,

      We have a caravan – though we like to call it our mini home. (There are some picture here.) We’ve been on the road for over 13 months now and although towing uses more fuel, the cost of staying in caravan parks (or free camping for that matter) is much cheaper than hotels or motels.

      Yallingup is a lovely place and I’m envious of your long lost cousin.

      Clare

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      1. OZ has such a variety of land (and poeple)!! If I go back there, I’d like to do a tour in a caravan. I love traveling like that, self contained, free…stop anywhere.

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