Kalbarri National Park

And The View Through Nature’s Window

Kalbarri National Park is one of Western Australia’s best known parks and covers an area of 1,830.05 km2 (706.6 sq mi).  It preserves an inland desert of stunning red and white striped Tumblagooda sandstone – a geological formation deposited between four to five hundred million years ago during either the Silurian or Ordovician periods, and is now exposed on the west coast of Australia in river and coastal gorges near the town of Kalbarri, straddling the boundary of the Carnarvon and Perth basins.

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The colours in the layers are spectacular.

Click here to read more about this incredible type of sandstone.

Wrapping around the town of Kalbarri, the national park also encompasses soaring seacliffs more than 100 metres high (328 feet) south of the town.  But it’s the lower reaches of the Murchison River and its gorge that are the main attraction (in my opinion).

It was the first spot on our must see list, in particular the most famous formation, Nature’s Window.

Nature's Window

Nature’s Window – A Natural Arch in Kalbarri National Park

We posed for a selfie – naturally, but to be honest, the view through the window was more worthy of sharing.

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The view through Nature’s Window

From the window, we walked across the top of the cliffs to get (and enjoy) a better view of the surrounding landscape.  It was pretty awesome, as was the sandstone we walked over and around.

Leaving Nature’s Window behind, we moved onto Z Bend, another area of the national park equally as spectacular, and it was amazing to stand at the lookout and gaze down on a view like this.

Z Bend, Kalbarri National Park

Z Bend, Kalbarri National Park

By the time we left Z Bend, it was creeping towards 10:00 am and already 39°C (102.2°F) and too hot to do anything more than return to our mini home and have a long, cold shower.

I can appreciate why winter is the busy season around here.


Tomorrow we’ll further explore the coastal area and the wind and water eroded rock formations including a sea stack and a natural bridge.

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