Above the 26th Parallel

The 26th parallel (south) is a circle of latitude that is 26 degrees south of the Earth’s equatorial plane.  It crosses the Atlantic Ocean, Africa, the Indian Ocean, Australasia, the Pacific Ocean and South America.

And it is the location that designates entering Australia’s North West.

Granted we passed the 26th parallel as we drove across Peron Peninsular to reach Denham, where we had Fun Times in Shark Bay, but it’s necessary to once again drive south to exit the peninsular before turning left and continuing north.

Dean and I are looking forward to discovering many of the wonderful things on offer in the North West.  According to Tourism Western Australia, the North West is:

One of the world’s last true wilderness areas and the place to go for an authentic Aussie outback adventure.

There are many things we are looking forward to doing and seeing – relaxing on Cable Beach and possible taking a camel ride, seeing the Bungle Bungle Range, visiting Horizontal Falls and the rocky landscapes of Karijini National Park, just to mention a few.

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Courtesy Australian Bureau of Meteorology (Click to enlarge)

Unfortunately, we’ve arrived at a time when Western Australia has become one of the hottest places on earth, so for now, we are keeping to the coast, as close to the water as possible, and we’re doing the best we can to stay cool.  We’ll see as much as we can all the same, though that might be less than we’d planned.

We are currently in the area shaded the darkest on the map and praying the heat lets up a little.


Thoughts on Location No 75 – Carnarvon, Gascoyne, Western Australia

Entering remote areas calls for a little planning, and Carnarvon offered us the chance to replenish groceries and other supplies before heading further north.

We stayed at the Outback Oasis Caravan Park, and enjoyed a longer stay than planned due to being offered a discount for being over 50.  This is the first park where we’ve been offered a discount based on our age (rather than pension eligibility), and we grabbed the discount and an extra nights stay for a very reasonable price.

One Mile Jetty - Carnarvon

One Mile Jetty – Carnarvon

There really isn’t much to do in Carnarvon, besides escaping the heat, yet we found a few things.

We walked along One Mile Jetty, but to be honest, it was so old and in such a state of disrepair, that we turned around before we reached the end.

On our second day, we took a drive north to Point Quobba.  It was a long drive to get there, almost and hour, though the water was cool, and the blow holes put on a bit of a show.

It’s really dry in this part of the country at this time of the year.  I could only imagine how pretty it is with the wildflowers blooming following the rain.  But there is no rain predicted and everything is showing signs of the arid conditions.

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The Gascoyne River devoid of any water

But judging by the work being carried out on stage two of flood mitigation around Carnarvon, once the rain does come, so does a hell of a lot of water.


We moved on to Coral Bay yesterday and it’s much cooler her, camped across the road from the beach, although today’s temperature is predicted to be hotter than yesterday. 

Fingers crossed it won’t be too much hotter.

4 Comments

  1. Look how far you have travelled !!…My, My, and so hot!! Looking at that dry old river bed just shows you the extent of the vast changes that can be experienced in rain fall and temperature. Keep you cool…. so to speak and keep on keeping on…… cheers D

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